Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

3rd and 4th gear Vanished

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 3rd and 4th gear Vanished

    Ive a KZJ95 1kz-te manual.
    Driving along i went to go to 3rd and it didnt exist. Neither did 4th, the rest of the gears were fine. There was no bad noise at all, they just disappeared. I couldnt drive around like this forever but i wish i had actually contemplated that a bit longer.
    Ive taken the gearbox off... what a job. Removing prop shafts, starter, clutch slave cylinder, exhaust section and then the transfer case (very heavy) and finally the gearbox. Slid her out this morning on a trolley jack on a sheet of wood on grass in the countryside here in NZ.
    Ive taken apart the gearbox, that went pretty well. I was hoping the fork selector bolt may have come undone but it seems like the hub for 3 and 4th have lost their splines.Holding input and output shaft with it in 3 and fourth you can turn them independently, unlike in 1st 2nd.
    Im just wondering if anyone has any experience of this? Ive heard its quite common including in hiluxs too but ive never heard/seen of it.
    Im hoping i just need to get the bearings pressed off and then press on a new hub. One guy said the shaft splines go too, which would make the work expensive, pretty much everyone else has said its normally just the hub.
    I live rural so i will need to somehow get it to a bearing press and get it done, maybe even hiking with it over my back so im hoping i can get a run down from someone who may have being here first so i know what to expect when i happen upon a press.
    As you can im sure realise money is tight so im not going to go for a full recondition like most people try to sell me (quite rightly they do)

  • #2
    Ive got the gearbox shafts now apart. Pressing needed was the adaptor locking plate on the end after the 5th gear. This takes two 8mm bolts to connect up to your press.
    The small bearing on the output shaft needed 40tonne to get it off but something seemed wrong here, it wasnt up and against its metal spacer either. In hindsight i should of just removed the fifth gear shift shaft to enable quicker progress.
    Once the secondary shaft was out i could then pull off the input shaft by undoing the fork for 3/4.
    And as told what was common to happen was what happened to mine, the splines on the inner hub were all gone. The main shaft splines it floats on were all fine luckily. What apparently happened is that they for some reason in the factory they didnt put splines on the whole way around the internal bore. Ive no idea why they didnt, maybe it floats easier, i dont even know if you want it floating easier, but anyway replacements ones apparently almost always come fully splined now.
    Job tomorrow is to get the replacement part and begin reconstructing her
    Eventually il get on to the cambelt replacement i had planned.
    Nice to be back on a push bike temporarily



    Comment


    • #3
      Ive the gears together and next step is to seal her up and check operation before installing. All sounds easy but it wont be, so i expect another two days.
      Heated up the bearings in oil and they went on easy with a drift.
      If you ever do this job i strongly suggest being very precise with gearsynchro etc orientation when dismantling as even a specialist i got to put the 3/4 hub together when i bought his full splined hub part got it wrong initially

      Comment


      • #4
        Ahh that brings back memories, as an apprentice getting given a tray with a completely dismantled gearbox internals on it and being told to reassemble it. Not having stripped it down made it a bit of a challenge shall we say lol
        02 VX, Toyota Alloy Bar, IPF 900XS with 50 watt HID, 50 mm Lift- Lovell Shocks n Springs, Safari Snorkel, large Pioneer tray, Pioneer In-dash, Alpine roof mount DVD screen -handled the Simpson and Innaminka roads, now with a little TRD blower & Unichip

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Leethal View Post
          Ahh that brings back memories, as an apprentice getting given a tray with a completely dismantled gearbox internals on it and being told to reassemble it. Not having stripped it down made it a bit of a challenge shall we say lol
          Wow thats almost like a puzzle with no pictures on it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Leethal View Post
            Ahh that brings back memories, as an apprentice getting given a tray with a completely dismantled gearbox internals on it and being told to reassemble it. Not having stripped it down made it a bit of a challenge shall we say lol
            I was thinking about what you wrote here Leethal while working on the car yesterday, Mechanics here wont touch a manual transmission, they send them away to a few specialists around the country. So were things different when you were an apprentice and mechanics did gearboxes? Whats changed? They all seem quite similar

            Comment


            • #7
              Ive got it all back together, Just installing gear oil and a few tidy up torquing of bolts. Getting it in was a real pain. Having a helper would be great. You really need a person on either side of the jack to get it to slip over the dowel pins so it doesnt hang. Same with the heavy awkward transfer case.
              Next step is test drive, heres a photo of the upper bolts you need to reach to undo the transmission from cylinder block
              A real slog of a job but im happy as its saved $2,000
              Will update after test driving

              Comment


              • #8
                Test drive all went well. IIt was a bit noisy for a split second as i went into each gear for the first time, my fault for not pre-oiling. But after that she was very good, quieter than previously. This may be due to a bearing on one of the shafts not being tight up against a spacer when i took it apart, allowing the spacer to rattle a bit previously.
                I dont want to load her up yet as im still a bit apprehensive but she seems good. It took me about 6 weeks after i fixed my front diff to not be sitting there with listening ears for any strange sound.
                Next job in a few weeks is cambelt.
                I did have trouble with the transfercase shift lever. It doesnt want to move. It looks like its in HL position but its actually in HH as the centre diff isnt locked. Im not concerned much as i still drive it fine since the centre diff isnt locked and i didnt have the case apart so i didnt do anything with the gears in there. Im picking ive installed it wrong somehow. theres some funny metal spring looking thing and you can see a slot at the bottom that the shifter goes into, maybe ive got that shifter a wrong way in somehow but if anyone has a tip on that itd be appreciated but i wont do that til tomorrow.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ive got some instructions here about how to do the transfercase lever. I wont do it for a few days as its ok as is but il reply if it doesnt work

                  Remove the lever from the turret and use a long screwdriver to click the right-hand selector shaft back into the 'Diff
                  Locked' position (HL). This aligns the two selector blocks as per my picture (you don't have to remove the turret to do
                  this).

                  Now make sure that the pointy end of the Transfer Lever goes into the gap between the blocks - keeping the spring to
                  its left.

                  Re-fit the retainer and the lever should be sprung to the right, move it to the left and click it back into 'H' and all
                  should be well - with the diff 'open'.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MikeyB View Post

                    I was thinking about what you wrote here Leethal while working on the car yesterday, Mechanics here wont touch a manual transmission, they send them away to a few specialists around the country. So were things different when you were an apprentice and mechanics did gearboxes? Whats changed? They all seem quite similar
                    Yes things were different, electronic fuel injection was about as flash as you could get, ECU's were not in cars and we played with carburettors, cams and cyl heads to increase performance, not a chip or piggyback computer
                    The biggest change in the industry is labour costs, for a lot of workshops it was/is easier and/or cheaper to replace a failed or faulty part with a new or exchange part rather than remove, strip down, diagnose then reassemble and refit the failed part, plus you then have to warrant the repair. By fitting complete part, either new or exchange, someone else covers the part's warranty, the workshop is only responsible for their labour (in theory). In my opinion this has lead to a lot of mechanics (or technician's in today speak) being essentially just fitters who really do not understand how things work, hence why many dealerships and workshops have reputations for poor workmanship.
                    I now work for a global engine manufacturer and we see similar issues across our industry, we are constantly working on improving dealer ability and standards, sorry for the long reply but poor skill sets are a pet bugbear for me.

                    Lee
                    02 VX, Toyota Alloy Bar, IPF 900XS with 50 watt HID, 50 mm Lift- Lovell Shocks n Springs, Safari Snorkel, large Pioneer tray, Pioneer In-dash, Alpine roof mount DVD screen -handled the Simpson and Innaminka roads, now with a little TRD blower & Unichip

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Leethal View Post

                      Yes things were different, electronic fuel injection was about as flash as you could get, ECU's were not in cars and we played with carburettors, cams and cyl heads to increase performance, not a chip or piggyback computer
                      The biggest change in the industry is labour costs, for a lot of workshops it was/is easier and/or cheaper to replace a failed or faulty part with a new or exchange part rather than remove, strip down, diagnose then reassemble and refit the failed part, plus you then have to warrant the repair. By fitting complete part, either new or exchange, someone else covers the part's warranty, the workshop is only responsible for their labour (in theory). In my opinion this has lead to a lot of mechanics (or technician's in today speak) being essentially just fitters who really do not understand how things work, hence why many dealerships and workshops have reputations for poor workmanship.
                      I now work for a global engine manufacturer and we see similar issues across our industry, we are constantly working on improving dealer ability and standards, sorry for the long reply but poor skill sets are a pet bugbear for me.

                      Lee
                      Great reply. Thanks very much that explains a lot to me. Workmanship is going down in many areas and its really interesting to hear whats happening in the car industry from someone in it.
                      I imagine that warranty is a big one too, putting that big risk on to someone elses business, as who knows what a driver may treat their car like once around the block. And if all you a doing is fitting replacement units you dont take so much pride in total immersion in to what you are actually doing

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That transfer case lever statement was what you need to do. The right one goes forward so just lever it back with a screwdriver into the middle with the other one which will be sitting there in the middle and then insert lever with keeping the big spring on the left which seems counterintuitive and forceful but it does work. Manual doesnt include this at all for whatever reason.
                        Job done

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X