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Is a pre fuel filter necessary or a good idea for my Prado 150

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  • Is a pre fuel filter necessary or a good idea for my Prado 150

    I am wondering if a pre fuel filter is a good idea to install in a 150 3lt diesel. I'm planning a trip in the desert country soon. I'm wondering if the bog-standard Toyota factory fuel filtering system is enough. I'm actually finding it very difficult to get a diesel mechanic who isn't flat out, to install one anyway at the moment, so probably will not be able to get one in before this trip. Question is, is it worth it into the future regardless.

  • #2
    A pre-filter or post-filter is a good investment, especially if outback. A water trap type is the best type. Easy to fit up yourself. it's about a 10-minute job.

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    • #3
      Like a lot of things in life, not essential but a really good idea. You don’t need a parachute until your plane starts going down. A second filter is a bit like that
      I put one on all my diesels as a first mod. Really easy to fit and to be really honest, if you can’t fit one by yourself, you probably shouldn’t be travelling anywhere remote.
      I chose a pre filter of 30 micron with a water separator. In reality I think a secondary filter is a better idea, but I’m wary of fuel line restrictions.
      I’ve been with vehicles in remote areas without them and everything was fine, I’ve also been in places with vehicles that didn’t have them and everything was not so fine. Chances are you’ll be ok, but it’s a risk you take.

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      • #4
        This wouldn't be a proper Internet forum without some conflicting opinions and advice, so here goes ;-).

        I don't have a secondary fuel filter, although, the Prado already has two filters: one between the tanks and one in the engine bay, so maybe I do ;-). (Not the same thing, I know.)

        Why? I like to keep things as simple and as stock as possible. I assume the Toyota filter is pretty good. The Toyota filter system has a water trap and an alarm, and I assume that is decent too. I carry spare filters.

        That just my thought process, but I don't necessarily know what I am talking about.

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        • #5
          Getting clean fuel to your injectors is critical, they are a crazy high tolerance bit of equipment. Having had water in my secondary filter and seeing how dirty it gets I'd say it a few dollars well spent.
          [B]Steve[/B]

          2010 Silver GXL Prado 150, D4D Auto, with a few non standard bits

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Grinbot View Post
            This wouldn't be a proper Internet forum without some conflicting opinions and advice, so here goes ;-).

            I don't have a secondary fuel filter, although, the Prado already has two filters: one between the tanks and one in the engine bay, so maybe I do ;-). (Not the same thing, I know.)

            Why? I like to keep things as simple and as stock as possible. I assume the Toyota filter is pretty good. The Toyota filter system has a water trap and an alarm, and I assume that is decent too. I carry spare filters.

            That just my thought process, but I don't necessarily know what I am talking about.

            As with everything factory, it is fit for purpose. Most people are never going to fill up in remote areas from dodgy tanks. Is a factory 5 micron filter sufficient filtration for Toyotas injection system? Absolutely! Years of research along with millions spent on engineering and I would trust Toyota.
            Can the above filter cope with a large amount of contamination in one go? Probably not so well, therefore I run a coarse pre filter with a water separator in case I have a bad tank of fuel The idea behind this is hopefully I’ll notice things are wrong before the factory filter is affected and this leaves that as a safety barrier.
            The in tank sock is more of a sieve than a filter, designed to catch only the real crappy stuff.
            Also, gradual condensation build up in the tank is probably as much to blame as the dodgy servos, so let’s not be too harsh on the fuel guys.
            We had a bad batch of diesel one trip through curtain springs. The prado had died before Ayers Rock. The mechanic in town said that servo keeps him in business!!!

            I also totally agree with grinbot that most factory things are very well designed and it’s only the after market sales guys that want us to think differently.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Daniel150 View Post


              As with everything factory, it is fit for purpose. Most people are never going to fill up in remote areas from dodgy tanks. Is a factory 5 micron filter sufficient filtration for Toyotas injection system? Absolutely! Years of research along with millions spent on engineering and I would trust Toyota.
              Can the above filter cope with a large amount of contamination in one go? Probably not so well, therefore I run a coarse pre filter with a water separator in case I have a bad tank of fuel The idea behind this is hopefully I’ll notice things are wrong before the factory filter is affected and this leaves that as a safety barrier.
              The in tank sock is more of a sieve than a filter, designed to catch only the real crappy stuff.
              Also, gradual condensation build up in the tank is probably as much to blame as the dodgy servos, so let’s not be too harsh on the fuel guys.
              We had a bad batch of diesel one trip through curtain springs. The prado had died before Ayers Rock. The mechanic in town said that servo keeps him in business!!!

              I also totally agree with grinbot that most factory things are very well designed and it’s only the after market sales guys that want us to think differently.
              I would like to agree, but then my beautifully designed Toyota pistons cracked, as did the guards. Toyota is very good, but they still design and manufacture on a cost/risk basis. And should the filter fail to catch moisture or dirt it's not a warranty issue...

              My cost/risk analysis found that it is $250 well spent.
              [B]Steve[/B]

              2010 Silver GXL Prado 150, D4D Auto, with a few non standard bits

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Daniel150 View Post


                As with everything factory, it is fit for purpose. Most people are never going to fill up in remote areas from dodgy tanks. Is a factory 5 micron filter sufficient filtration for Toyotas injection system? Absolutely!
                Factory filters micron number are an unknown rating, but some mines have had them tested and they came out at 13 micron.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by krypto View Post

                  I would like to agree, but then my beautifully designed Toyota pistons cracked, as did the guards. Toyota is very good, but they still design and manufacture on a cost/risk basis. And should the filter fail to catch moisture or dirt it's not a warranty issue...

                  My cost/risk analysis found that it is $250 well spent.
                  Well put!!! I too invest in extra protection for my vehicle but I just stop short of thinking every aftermarket mod is a total necessity.
                  The small fortune sitting in my driveway has a lot of aftermarket precautions on it

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Piggy View Post

                    Factory filters micron number are an unknown rating, but some mines have had them tested and they came out at 13 micron.
                    I’ll have to chase down the source, but I did manage to find the factory spec and it was 5 micron.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I too would go for a prefilter, doesn't hurt to have two stages of protection. Same for engine oil, I run a bypass filter this with an EGR makes a hell of a
                      difference to the engine oil which is still clean at 5000K'ms whereas without the oil is dirty after a 30 minute drive.

                      Helped out a guy on the Savanah way who filled up 30 minutes before, he had already swapped out one set of filters and second set were now clogging.
                      HKB Electronics, manufacturer of the Alternator Voltage Booster, Silver 2008 D4D,Lifted,Underbody protection, Alternator Voltage Booster, Tiger Z winch, Lightforce DL, Air Horns, Tanami Drawers, Drop down fridge slide, Outback cargo barriers, Rotronics dual Battery system, Polaris GPS, HF/UHF/VHF, Radio speaker combiner, Long ranger water tank, Diff breathers, Inverter, Snorkel and others

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Daniel150 View Post

                        I’ll have to chase down the source, but I did manage to find the factory spec and it was 5 micron.
                        Would be interested in the source. A mate runs a fleet of almost 500 Toyotas and Toyota couldn't provide them with what micron it is, hence them doing their own testing and coming out to 13-15 micron on a test of 20 filters over 5 batches from different suppliers to ensure a broad range test.. . They have fitted 30 micron Pre-Filters now, and 5 micron Post filters on some that are 100% used in questionable fuel supply areas.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          So, what is it about pre or post filters that will save your engine from contaminated fuel?

                          A prefilter will trap a certain amount of water or dirt before the water passes to the main filter or the dirt constricts fuel flow. If the fuel is heavily contaminated it would very unlikely that you would notice visually before it clogged unless it has a warning light, like the OEM filter. If not, you'll need to replace it along with the main filter after the warning light shows.

                          A post filter is of use if the main filter does not filter finely enough. I don't know, but would hope the OEM Toyota are fit for purpose. Either way, a post filter won't perform any function if the main filter is clogged. Back to the warning light and finding the spare filter.

                          If you travel in places with potentially dodgy diesel fuel supply the obvious answer is to filter the fuel BEFORE it goes into your tank. The amount of water or dirt that any automotive filter is capable of removing is quite small. I live on a boat with 3 diesel engines, travel to places where good fuel is sometimes hard to find, so this is part of our lives. Without going down the road of input filters or fuel polishing systems, the simplest solution for the quantities that we put into our vehicles is to use a water separating funnel filter. A cheap and fool proof way of avoiding most filter clogging problems. The bonus is that you can see that the fuel you are purchasing is contaminated as you dispense it. Find another servo or steal jerries from one of your other mates. Either way the funnel makes sure that the fuel going into your tanks is water free and most larger particles are removed.

                          Water Separating Fuel Filter Funnel (wades.net.au)

                          My opinion is to buy one of these and a spare OEM filter or two.
                          Last edited by Prada; 21-05-2022, 11:00 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Prada View Post
                            So, what is it about pre or post filters that will save your engine from contaminated fuel?

                            A prefilter will trap a certain amount of water or dirt before the water passes to the main filter or the dirt constricts fuel flow. If the fuel is heavily contaminated it would very unlikely that you would notice visually before it clogged unless it has a warning light, like the OEM filter. If not, you'll need to replace it along with the main filter after the warning light shows.

                            A post filter is of use if the main filter does not filter finely enough. I don't know, but would hope the OEM Toyota are fit for purpose. Either way, a post filter won't perform any function if the main filter is clogged. Back to the warning light and finding the spare filter.

                            If you travel in places with potentially dodgy diesel fuel supply the obvious answer is to filter the fuel BEFORE it goes into your tank. The amount of water or dirt that any automotive filter is capable of removing is quite small. I live on a boat with 3 diesel engines, travel to places where good fuel is sometimes hard to find, so this is part of our lives. Without going down the road of input filters or fuel polishing systems, the simplest solution for the quantities that we put into our vehicles is to use a water separating funnel filter. A cheap and fool proof way of avoiding most filter clogging problems. The bonus is that you can see that the fuel you are purchasing is contaminated as you dispense it. Find another servo or steal jerries from one of your other mates. Either way the funnel makes sure that the fuel going into your tanks is water free and most larger particles are removed.

                            Water Separating Fuel Filter Funnel (wades.net.au)

                            My opinion is to buy one of these and a spare OEM filter or two.
                            I bought one of these filters from WADES. First test today showed that as the filter gauze was extremely fine, the flow rate is very very slow. At the local Ampol garage I put through 3 litres in about 5 minutes. For an empty 150 litre tank it would take some time. Might be OK for a partial fill, top up, or your lawn mower. I'll stick with carrying spares.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks everyone for contributing. I want to protect my investment for sure. I put a pre fuel filter on today and I have some peace of mind. I think it will be worth having it on in the long run. I like the idea of "protect it and you won't need it, let it ride and you more than likely wished you had".

                              Comment

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