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Bash Plates, when are they needed, what are the most vulnerable spots

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  • Bash Plates, when are they needed, what are the most vulnerable spots

    Hi Guys,
    Firstly, I'm after some words of wisdom about bash plates for my 120.
    I have a bar, but there is a fair open space behind it which I think makes the radiator vulnerable. I have 3mil aluminium sheeting in the garage and thought I might make a plate to fill the spot. Do you think 3mil aluminium will suffice (I guess I could add some ribs).

    Second, does the prado (petrol, 4 speed) have particular spots that are particularly vulnerable to damage that are not already protected?

    Thirdly, I don't do any heavy 4x4, I use it more for touring at this point, but there will always be detours where I will make good use of the FWD capabilities (and always possible to find myself on a rougher track than anticipated too). Can I justify/benefit getting bash plates installed (always a bad feeling when you hear a bang under the car you weren't expecting), and I am conscious of the extra weight, so what thickness should the plates be for very occasional use? Any recommendations would be great.

  • #2
    3mm aluminium would do the trick i reckon. I got the bushskinz4x4 4mm bashplates installed. Radiator is a good item to protect, then sump, then transmission. You could go nuts with protection, but as you say, cost and weight would be an issue.
    04' 120 PRADO GXL 4ltr Petrol V6 4mm bushskinz steel bashplate 8Tonne recovery points Ironman 4x4 Snorkel 2” lift and other bits of fruit, ready for the next adventure

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    • #3
      No mate 3mm alubillycan is way too thin. Even steel plates are 4mm so in alloy you'd be looking at maybe 8mm??
      I'd just buy a Bushskins but make sure it's got the oil drain hole. Mine is an older Bushskins and it's a pain to do an oil change, plate has to come off.
      Unless you have an auto the stock plate would suffice, but if she's auto you should get an extra plate to cover the auto's sump.
      The extra weight is about to a passenger so not too much of a worry.

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      • #4
        Thanks guys, much appreciated. Yes I've heard the Bushskins are a good solid product (but heavy @ 4mm). Does the Bushskins cover the radiator or do they only start at the motor?
        Agree about the aluminium, but I may put on some steel ribbing and use it as a temp fix, as at the moment even a solid stick could cause radiator problems as its a pretty big gap behind the bullbar.

        The weight adds up quick: Bullbar 30KG, Winch Cradle 26KG, winch 32KG, bashplates 48KG??, less original bumperbar (15KG) = 121KG

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        • #5
          The Bushskinz bolts to the front radiator cross member, same as your factory plate.
          It fully covers the bottom tank etc but mine's a bit older, I think their latest offering has air holes as my version didn't allow much airflow to the front diff region.
          I think it weighs 25kg, I had it on my chest yesterday to do an oil change out here in the dirt.
          Everything adds weight to these cars, winch usually also means an extra battery.
          I used the factory alloy bar which would save quite a bit.
          Weight difference between factory plates and a Bushskins would be about 18kg.

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          • #6
            i have a set of bush skinz i am taking off if any one in SA is interested
            very good product, they are on a D4D manual (has longer rear plate than the petrol
            2008 Dune D4D manual GXL update - with lots of fruit !! + Roma Razorback Off Road Van

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