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Errors/Malfunctions on 2020 VX Prado

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  • #16
    Started at 0w-20. I noticed in my mates 2016 hilux his was 0w-30 as well. I’m unsure if this was an error in the manual or a deliberate change with the new 150kw 1gd-ftv for fuel economy reasons. Regardless the dealer changed it to 0w-30 and cleared the faults. Please see attached extract from my 2020 VX owners manual.

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    • #17
      The use of 0W-20 or even 0W-30 oil seems very likely to be an attempt to improve fuel efficiency without full consideration of environmental factors. It is completely inappropriate for the majority of conditions found in Australia. The chart in this short article explains it quite well. https://www.stikkitnow.com/0w20-vs-5w30-motor-oil/

      It is conceivable and probable that under load and at higher ambient temperatures the oil becomes too viscous for the oil pump to maintain adequate output pressure, which in turn triggers the low oil pressure alarm. It would be better and more appropriate to have an alarm light rather than some obscure code to indicate this problem, as in the tractor mentioned above.

      If the problem goes away with higher viscosity oil, then the problem was the oil and not some other issue in the oil cooler.

      As for damage, tricky... hopefully, the alarm light comes on before pressure is low enough to cause damage, which would be normal design practice. If that is not the case, then depending on how long the alarm was active it is possible some premature wear and damage will occur.
      [B]Steve[/B]

      2010 Silver GXL Prado 150, D4D Auto, with a few non standard bits

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Pudley View Post
        Started at 0w-20. I noticed in my mates 2016 hilux his was 0w-30 as well. I’m unsure if this was an error in the manual or a deliberate change with the new 150kw 1gd-ftv for fuel economy reasons. Regardless the dealer changed it to 0w-30 and cleared the faults. Please see attached extract from my 2020 VX owners manual.
        Personally I wouldn't be using 0W-30, I'd opt for 5W-40 or 10W-40 as a minimum for most Australian conditions.
        [B]Steve[/B]

        2010 Silver GXL Prado 150, D4D Auto, with a few non standard bits

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        • #19
          Originally posted by krypto View Post

          Personally I wouldn't be using 0W-30, I'd opt for 5W-40 or 10W-40 as a minimum for most Australian conditions.

          Given my cars in warranty for the next 5 years I won’t be using anything that’s not recommended or put in by Toyota.

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          • #20
            The last sentence says it all. Might be right oil for mid winter Russia but not summer Australia.

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            • #21
              Also I haven't seen the C2 grade required with the DPF in higher levels than 0_ 30.

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              • #22
                I find all this a bit confusing especially as there is contradicting information on the net.
                I always thought that the hotter a liquid becomes the thinner it is, yet oils have additives which make it do the opposite? so thin for easier flow when cold starting yet thicken for protection when hot.
                The link given by krypto above has a chart showing the recommended oil to use in different ambient temperatures, According to that 0W20 covers a range of -40C to +10C, while other websites quote -40 to +20C both would suggest that 404pug's comment about Russia and Australia is on the money.
                I don't know for sure but I cant see that krypto's comment that "under load and at higher ambient temperatures the oil becomes too viscous for the oil pump to maintain adequate output pressure" can be right. I would think the opposite is true? I quoted my old clapped out engine having low pressure at tick over as I think the low pressure is caused by thin hot oil escaping from all the worn bits in the engine and I assume that the Toyota engines are losing pressure because the oil is like gnat's piss and escaping where it shouldn't even in such a close tolerance modern engine.
                I can see why manufacturers specify such thin oils as the thinner the oil the better fuel consumption. Apparently the consumption improvement between 0W20 and 5W30 is around 1.5% so that alone seems an incentive to suggest the thinnest oil possible.
                One other thing that puzzles me is why the ambient temperature is so relevant. I can see that the lower the cold figure is the easier the oil will flow when the engine is cold, so easier starting and more protection when starting from cold as the oil can circulate easier and faster. However at normal running temperatures an engine would be mid 80's C which surely would be the same in most ambient temperatures?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Pudley View Post


                  Given my cars in warranty for the next 5 years I won’t be using anything that’s not recommended or put in by Toyota.
                  Unfortunately based on experience that won't save you when you have problems. 0-30w is the wrong oil for our climate.

                  If the Toyota specifications are always correct explain to me the crazy temperatures that the transmission reaches without an aftermarket oil cooler. And the 'sealed for life transmission', I change the oil every 50k and it's always showing early signs of degradation. In the end we all do what we think is right, I'll stick with the facts and science which is pretty clear on the engine oil.
                  Last edited by krypto; 23-11-2020, 10:44 AM.
                  [B]Steve[/B]

                  2010 Silver GXL Prado 150, D4D Auto, with a few non standard bits

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by JohnLynn View Post
                    I find all this a bit confusing especially as there is contradicting information on the net.
                    I always thought that the hotter a liquid becomes the thinner it is, yet oils have additives which make it do the opposite? so thin for easier flow when cold starting yet thicken for protection when hot.
                    The link given by krypto above has a chart showing the recommended oil to use in different ambient temperatures, According to that 0W20 covers a range of -40C to +10C, while other websites quote -40 to +20C both would suggest that 404pug's comment about Russia and Australia is on the money.
                    I don't know for sure but I cant see that krypto's comment that "under load and at higher ambient temperatures the oil becomes too viscous for the oil pump to maintain adequate output pressure" can be right. I would think the opposite is true? I quoted my old clapped out engine having low pressure at tick over as I think the low pressure is caused by thin hot oil escaping from all the worn bits in the engine and I assume that the Toyota engines are losing pressure because the oil is like gnat's piss and escaping where it shouldn't even in such a close tolerance modern engine.
                    I can see why manufacturers specify such thin oils as the thinner the oil the better fuel consumption. Apparently the consumption improvement between 0W20 and 5W30 is around 1.5% so that alone seems an incentive to suggest the thinnest oil possible.
                    One other thing that puzzles me is why the ambient temperature is so relevant. I can see that the lower the cold figure is the easier the oil will flow when the engine is cold, so easier starting and more protection when starting from cold as the oil can circulate easier and faster. However at normal running temperatures an engine would be mid 80's C which surely would be the same in most ambient temperatures?
                    Good pickup, that was a typo.Under load and temp oil becomes less viscous not more viscous. Liquids become thinner under increased temperature, that's basic science.

                    The logic is pretty simple, lower viscosity oil reduces fuel consumption which sells cars. The engine will survive regardless, but wear will be increased. Ambient temperature matters because while the coolant reaches a pretty good steady state, different parts of the engine get a lot hotter than coolant temp.

                    Toyota build great cars but they are a manufacturer that needs to cover broad markets and make money.
                    Last edited by krypto; 23-11-2020, 10:45 AM.
                    [B]Steve[/B]

                    2010 Silver GXL Prado 150, D4D Auto, with a few non standard bits

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Really low engine oil viscosity for our climate & non-serviced auto transmissions seems like an attempt to get the car to expensively fail sooner rather than later after the warranty period. Maybe an earlier failure of cars = increased car turnover & increased new car sales. Apple tried it on with a performance zapping IOS update in the past. I know someone who bought a new car after their late model car needed to go into the shop for a new alternator. There’d be more out there like that person.
                      Last edited by Brett1979; 23-11-2020, 01:43 PM.
                      2005 120 series V6 Grande, 2 inch susp lift (King/EFS combo), 32 inch MT’s, Safari Snorkel, rear diff lock, breathers, Light Force spotlights, UHF, dual batteries.

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